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  1. DOC
  2. TXT

“Time is what exists, and the accident is what happens. You have a substance that exists, like a mountain. And then you have the event: the earthquake. I didn’t study disasters, but accidents—rupture. Substance is necessary and absolute, accidents are relative and contingent.”
Paul Virilio Interview by Caroline Dumoucel, Vice Magazine, 2010

Considering the content of the work going along with it’s format, we will emphasize on a practice of space intrinsically linked with what happens ; towards a practice of situations. Other than what we can produce materially (what we can design and build), a situation is a set of conditions, rather than a formal outcome.

It's a moment, produced in both space and time, ranging across material, social, political and economic relations. Events; occurring, intended, by accident, gotten out of hand, daily, spectacular - situations are everywhere, which makes it challenging to define what it is as a practice.

The practice of ‘space’ exceeds any formal definition of it (the theory, the model), because it revolves around the experience of it (here, now). Then, relating it to the architectural field, it’s like putting the gears in reverse: space exists because we occupy it. In that sense, it does not rely on design (the plan, the image), but on the potential of design (the effect, transcendence).

If you want to dance, you don’t have to build a dancefloor: you just have to dance.

with Laure Jaffuel & Elise Van Mourik